Downloads:

371

Downloads of v 2.0.9686:

371

Last Update:

7/14/2017

Package Maintainer(s):

Software Author(s):

  • Nuts About Nets LLC

Tags:

nutsaboutnets netstress network benchmarking benchmark stress tool admin

NetStress (Install)

2.0.9686 | Updated: 7/14/2017

Downloads:

371

Downloads of v 2.0.9686:

371

Maintainer(s):

Software Author(s):

  • Nuts About Nets LLC

NetStress (Install) 2.0.9686

All Checks are Passing

2 Passing Test


Validation Testing Passed


Verification Testing Passed

Details

To install NetStress (Install), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

To upgrade NetStress (Install), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

To uninstall NetStress (Install), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

NOTE: This applies to both open source and commercial editions of Chocolatey.

1. Ensure you are set for organizational deployment

Please see the organizational deployment guide

  • Open Source or Commercial:
    • Proxy Repository - Create a proxy nuget repository on Nexus, Artifactory Pro, or a proxy Chocolatey repository on ProGet. Point your upstream to https://chocolatey.org/api/v2. Packages cache on first access automatically. Make sure your choco clients are using your proxy repository as a source and NOT the default community repository. See source command for more information.
    • You can also just download the package and push it to a repository Download

3. Enter your internal repository url

(this should look similar to https://chocolatey.org/api/v2)

4. Choose your deployment method:


choco upgrade netstress -y --source="'STEP 3 URL'" [other options]

See options you can pass to upgrade.

See best practices for scripting.

Add this to a PowerShell script or use a Batch script with tools and in places where you are calling directly to Chocolatey. If you are integrating, keep in mind enhanced exit codes.

If you do use a PowerShell script, use the following to ensure bad exit codes are shown as failures:


choco upgrade netstress -y --source="'STEP 3 URL'" 
$exitCode = $LASTEXITCODE

Write-Verbose "Exit code was $exitCode"
$validExitCodes = @(0, 1605, 1614, 1641, 3010)
if ($validExitCodes -contains $exitCode) {
  Exit 0
}

Exit $exitCode

- name: Ensure netstress installed
  win_chocolatey:
    name: netstress
    state: present
    version: 2.0.9686
    source: STEP 3 URL

See docs at https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/latest/modules/win_chocolatey_module.html.

Coming early 2020! Central Managment Reporting available now! More information...


chocolatey_package 'netstress' do
  action    :install
  version  '2.0.9686'
  source   'STEP 3 URL'
end

See docs at https://docs.chef.io/resource_chocolatey_package.html.


Chocolatey::Ensure-Package
(
    Name: netstress,
    Version: 2.0.9686,
    Source: STEP 3 URL
);

Requires Otter Chocolatey Extension. See docs at https://inedo.com/den/otter/chocolatey.


cChocoPackageInstaller netstress
{
   Name     = 'netstress'
   Ensure   = 'Present'
   Version  = '2.0.9686'
   Source   = 'STEP 3 URL'
}

Requires cChoco DSC Resource. See docs at https://github.com/chocolatey/cChoco.


package { 'netstress':
  provider => 'chocolatey',
  ensure   => '2.0.9686',
  source   => 'STEP 3 URL',
}

Requires Puppet Chocolatey Provider module. See docs at https://forge.puppet.com/puppetlabs/chocolatey.


salt '*' chocolatey.install netstress version="2.0.9686" source="STEP 3 URL"

See docs at https://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/ref/modules/all/salt.modules.chocolatey.html.

5. If applicable - Chocolatey configuration/installation

See infrastructure management matrix for Chocolatey configuration elements and examples.

Private CDN cached downloads available for licensed customers. Never experience 404 breakages again! Learn more...

This package was approved by moderator AdmiringWorm on 7/22/2017.

Description

In order to test and troubleshoot networks we need tools that allow us to generate network traffic and analyze the network's throughput performance. This is true for both wired and wireless networks. We focus strictly on 802.11 (WiFi) networks because analysis tools are relatively scarce or, when available, tend to be rather expensive and overly complex to use. Also, because WiFi networks are sensitive to RF interference from other wireless devices, they are more difficult to troubleshoot and transient changes in the local environment may affect their performance. Tools that are typically used to troubleshoot wireless networks report signal strengths of RF interference or beacons from an access point in units of dBm or RSSI (relative signal strength indication). But what do these really mean? How do these translate in terms of the performance of your wireless network?

Our wireless network adapter may report the beacon strength of our access point to be -53 dBm or -65 dBm or -73 dBm or (fill-in some number). Or, our RF spectrum analyzer displays a -74 dBm interference peak in the middle of channel 6. Or, we and our neighbor or the business next door have our access points configured to use channel 11? Is this good? Bad? Doesn't matter? Ultimately, the bottom line and what we care about most is throughput -- that is, how many bytes-per-sec can be transferred from one node on the wireless network to another. The dBm and RSSI numbers don't mean much if you can't somehow relate them to a performance metric -- the most relevant being 'bytes / sec'. In order to properly troubleshoot a wireless network we need a way to benchmark its performance, so as modifications are made we can determine whether or not they really make a difference in the network's performance.

This is where NetStress fits in. It's a simple tool, originally created for our internal use, which we later realized would also be of value to others. Here's the ideal scenario: You install a new wireless network and it works perfectly. Run NetStress and record the benchmark results for later reference. Sometime in the future when either you or others suspect performance has declined then run NetStress again and compare the latest results with those you gathered when the network was first installed and working "perfectly". The results of that comparison will indicate whether or not there really is a problem and dictate which steps to take next (if any). Regardless of your technical expertise or how expensive your diagnostic tools, if you are modifying a wireless network or making decisions to modify it and you are not testing throughput then you risk wasting time and resources going down the wrong path.

Screenshot of NetStress

NetStress includes the following features:

  • single instance of the application (i.e. each instance can be used as server or server plus client)
  • supports both TCP and UDP data transfers
  • supports multiple data streams
  • variable TCP / UDP segment size
  • rate of packet transmission (Packets Per Second)
  • variable Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)
  • uplink and downlink modes
  • auto node discovery
  • choice of display units (KBps, Kbps, MBps, Mbps)
  • support for multiple network adapters

tools\chocolateyinstall.ps1
$packageName    = 'netstress'
$installerType  = 'exe'
$url            = 'https://nutsaboutnets-downloads.s3.amazonaws.com/NetStress-Setup.exe'
$checksum       = 'A298B42B4C11209E3BD6DB71E1C6E718F2223807A1CFAC6A3640A3735028EA1B'
$silentArgs     = '/VERYSILENT /SUPPRESSMSGBOXES /NORESTART /SP-'
$toolsDir       = "$(Split-Path -parent $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition)"
$validExitCodes = @(0)
$softwareName   = 'NetStress*'

$packageArgs = @{
  packageName   = $packageName
  unzipLocation = $toolsDir  
  fileType      = $installerType
  url           = $url
  validExitCodes= $validExitCodes
  silentArgs    = $silentArgs
  softwareName  = $softwareName
  checksum      = $checksum
  checksumType  = 'sha256' 
}

Install-ChocolateyPackage @packageArgs

In cases where actual malware is found, the packages are subject to removal. Software sometimes has false positives. Moderators do not necessarily validate the safety of the underlying software, only that a package retrieves software from the official distribution point and/or validate embedded software against official distribution point (where distribution rights allow redistribution).

Chocolatey Pro provides runtime protection from possible malware.

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